Review: Mist by Susan Krinard

Mist
Susan Krinard
Centuries ago, all was lost in the Last Battle when the Norse gods and goddesses went to war. The elves, the giants, and the gods and goddesses themselves were all destroyed, leaving the Valkyrie Mist one of the only survivors.

Or so she thought.

When a snowy winter descends upon modern-day San Francisco in June, Mist’s quiet existence starts to feel all too familiar. In quick succession, Mist is attacked by a frost giant in a public park and runs into an elf disguised as a homeless person on the streets…and then the man Mist believed was her mortal boyfriend reveals himself to be the trickster god Loki, alive and well after all these years.

Loki has big plans for the modern world, and he’s been hanging around Mist to get access to a staff that once belonged to the great god Odin. Mist is certain of one thing: Loki must be stopped if there is to be any hope for Earth. But the fight is even bigger than she knows.

Because Loki wasn’t the only god to survive.

Susan Krinard has been writing paranormal romance and fantasy since 1993, when a published author friend read a short story she’d written and advised her to try writing a novel. She sold her first novel to Bantam Dell, and has since written for Bantam, Penguin, Harlequin/ Silhouette, Harper Collins, St. Martin’s Press., and Tor Books. Her output includes twenty-three novels and twelve novellas and short stories.
Susan’s love for Science Fiction and Fantasy began when her fourth grade teacher read Madeleine L’Engles’ A Wrinkle In Time to the class. She attended her first Star Trek convention at the age of 14. Since then she’s continued to read voraciously and has attended numerous local and World Science Fiction conventions. Her first major urban fantasy series is the “Midgard” series, beginning with Mist, a July 2013 release from Tor Books.
Susan and works in Albuquerque, New Mexico, with her husband Serge Mailloux—whom she met because of a mutual love of the works of writer C. J. Cherryh—dogs Cagney, Nahla and Freya, and cats Agatha and Rocky. http://www.susankrinard.com

Review: Earthfall by Mark Walden

The battle for mankind is about to begin in this riveting story of Earth’s invasion from the author of the H.I.V.E. series.

Sam awakens to see strange vessels gathered in the skies around London. As he stares up, people stream past, walking silently toward the enormous ships, which emit a persistent noise. Only Sam seems immune to the signal. Six months later, he is absolutely alone.

Or so he thinks. Because after he emerges from his underground bunker and is wounded by a flying drone, a hail of machine-gun fire ultimately reveals two very important truths: One, Sam is not, in fact, alone. And two, the drone injury should have killed him—but it didn’t.

With his home planet feeling alien and the future unstable and unclear, Sam must navigate a new world in this gripping adventure.

Review
Thank you Simon and Schuster Canada for providing the ARC.

It has been a while since I've read a middle grade book let along an amazing one. I was kind of worried because I thought MG was not for me anymore, because the past few MG titles I read just didn't amaze me. So I am so glad that this title worked for me.

I have to say at first I wasn't that into the book (but I was having a book hangover). So after I read the first chapter I'm like "oh no, that's A LOT of description". I knew that Mark just wanted to establish the background and the setting but it was just almost pure description. But after that one (almost dreadful) chapter, the book was fast-paced, interesting, and enjoyable.

There's only one way I can describe the book and it is…..if you like the feel of Call of Duty, this book is a winner for you. And oh look Mark spend 10 years as a video games designer and producer! :O I legitimately didn't know that fact but now I can totally understand why the book was like a video game. I really felt that I was an avatar in a game, running through the dead, dark streets, all dirty, hungry and scared. 
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Review: Earthfall by Mark Walden

The battle for mankind is about to begin in this riveting story of Earth’s invasion from the author of the H.I.V.E. series.

Sam awakens to see strange vessels gathered in the skies around London. As he stares up, people stream past, walking silently toward the enormous ships, which emit a persistent noise. Only Sam seems immune to the signal. Six months later, he is absolutely alone.

Or so he thinks. Because after he emerges from his underground bunker and is wounded by a flying drone, a hail of machine-gun fire ultimately reveals two very important truths: One, Sam is not, in fact, alone. And two, the drone injury should have killed him—but it didn’t.

With his home planet feeling alien and the future unstable and unclear, Sam must navigate a new world in this gripping adventure.

Review
Thank you Simon and Schuster Canada for providing the ARC.

It has been a while since I’ve read a middle grade book let along an amazing one. I was kind of worried because I thought MG was not for me anymore, because the past few MG titles I read just didn’t amaze me. So I am so glad that this title worked for me.

I have to say at first I wasn’t that into the book (but I was having a book hangover). So after I read the first chapter I’m like “oh no, that’s A LOT of description”. I knew that Mark just wanted to establish the background and the setting but it was just almost pure description. But after that one (almost dreadful) chapter, the book was fast-paced, interesting, and enjoyable.

There’s only one way I can describe the book and it is…..if you like the feel of Call of Duty, this book is a winner for you. And oh look Mark spend 10 years as a video games designer and producer! :O I legitimately didn’t know that fact but now I can totally understand why the book was like a video game. I really felt that I was an avatar in a game, running through the dead, dark streets, all dirty, hungry and scared. 

But I have to say there was almost no suspense in the first part of the book because there was a time jump back in time. It talked about how the aliens attacked and it was just typical stuff: “Aliens suddenly appeared. Sam was the only unaffected by hypnotism. Blah blah blah.”

There wasn’t a lot of character development because of the time jumps. “The next couple of months seemed to pass by in a blur for Sam.” (101) I guess Mark didn’t want to spend a shit load of blah blah like most apocalyptic stories on the training. Which was fine, and I actually liked that but we did lose the transition and the growth of the characters.

Without character development, the characters were not really memorable. Sure I liked them but they didn’t stick in my mind. The interactions between characters were fun though, they joke, they laugh, they fight. I think it was pretty awesome. I liked how Sam was a newbie but he was a leader. And what was more was that he wasn’t the type of leader that whined and complained about “I don’t want to be the leader”. He just simply lead the team.

I think one of the biggest reasons I loved this book was that there was no deep thinking shit, no angst, no “boohoo I’m stuck in this horrible place and I must be tough”. All there were actions and doings. This made this book super fast to read; before I knew it I was half way through! So like a video game, this book was very addicting to me. I just wanted to follow the characters and complete tasks, and fight aliens! If you want the rush of video games, read this book!


Final thought? Though this book was not on the level of “Percy Jackson”, but it was definitely a must read! Definitely can’t wait for the next book!


Review: Forgive Me, Leonard Peacock by Matthew Quick

Forgive Me, Leonard Peacock by Matthew Quick

In addition to the P-38, there are four gifts, one for each of my friends. I want to say good-bye to them properly. I want to give them each something to remember me by. To let them know I really cared about them and I'm sorry I couldn't be more than I was—that I couldn't stick around—and that what's going to happen today isn't their fault.

Today is Leonard Peacock's birthday. It is also the day he hides a gun in his backpack. Because today is the day he will kill his former best friend, and then himself, with his grandfather's P-38 pistol.

But first he must say good-bye to the four people who matter most to him: his Humphrey Bogart-obsessed next-door neighbor, Walt; his classmate Baback, a violin virtuoso; Lauren, the Christian homeschooler he has a crush on; and Herr Silverman, who teaches the high school's class on the Holocaust. Speaking to each in turn, Leonard slowly reveals his secrets as the hours tick by and the moment of truth approaches.

In this riveting book, acclaimed author Matthew Quick unflinchingly examines the impossible choices that must be made—and the light in us all that never goes out.

Review
Thank you HBG Canada for providing a beautiful ARC of FM,LP

I can see many people will enjoy Forgive Me, Leonard Peacock and I admit, it definitely has a lot going for it. It's a modern story, highlighting two issues that have manage to persist through time. I will only mention one of the issues here, because I want other readers to find out about the other one as they read through the story. If you have read the description on the back of the book, you can probably guessed the issue Leonard Peacock is facing – bullying. He's been bullied to a point that committing a murder-suicide appears to be the best option. Now, I didn't give this book 5-stars because I thought it was a sad story and it moved me. Sometimes, I feel like sad books get automatic good ratings purely because they made the readers cry. Those 5-stars got there because the story was painfully realistic – no matter how much you want to deny it and live in your happy little bubble, this book brings you back down to Earth. And that hurts. Reality sucks but Matthew Quick was able to put to words feelings most of us can't express. And you better believe that deserves 5-stars.
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Review: Forgive Me, Leonard Peacock by Matthew Quick

Forgive Me, Leonard Peacock by Matthew Quick

In addition to the P-38, there are four gifts, one for each of my friends. I want to say good-bye to them properly. I want to give them each something to remember me by. To let them know I really cared about them and I’m sorry I couldn’t be more than I was—that I couldn’t stick around—and that what’s going to happen today isn’t their fault.

Today is Leonard Peacock’s birthday. It is also the day he hides a gun in his backpack. Because today is the day he will kill his former best friend, and then himself, with his grandfather’s P-38 pistol.

But first he must say good-bye to the four people who matter most to him: his Humphrey Bogart-obsessed next-door neighbor, Walt; his classmate Baback, a violin virtuoso; Lauren, the Christian homeschooler he has a crush on; and Herr Silverman, who teaches the high school’s class on the Holocaust. Speaking to each in turn, Leonard slowly reveals his secrets as the hours tick by and the moment of truth approaches.

In this riveting book, acclaimed author Matthew Quick unflinchingly examines the impossible choices that must be made—and the light in us all that never goes out.

Review
Thank you HBG Canada for providing a beautiful ARC of FM,LP

I can see many people will enjoy Forgive Me, Leonard Peacock and I admit, it definitely has a lot going for it. It’s a modern story, highlighting two issues that have manage to persist through time. I will only mention one of the issues here, because I want other readers to find out about the other one as they read through the story. If you have read the description on the back of the book, you can probably guessed the issue Leonard Peacock is facing – bullying. He’s been bullied to a point that committing a murder-suicide appears to be the best option. Now, I didn’t give this book 5-stars because I thought it was a sad story and it moved me. Sometimes, I feel like sad books get automatic good ratings purely because they made the readers cry. Those 5-stars got there because the story was painfully realistic – no matter how much you want to deny it and live in your happy little bubble, this book brings you back down to Earth. And that hurts. Reality sucks but Matthew Quick was able to put to words feelings most of us can’t express. And you better believe that deserves 5-stars.

So maybe some of you might think the plot is too cookie-cutter, because if you had previously read any bullying story, it probably went down the same way Leonard’s story did. But that doesn’t make it any less enjoyable. Although his story may sound Plain-Jane, his character wasn’t. I was able to feel Leonard’s frustrations, confusion and hopelessness. The stylistic choices, like the footnotes and indents, solidified Leonard’s character. His brain worked at such a fast pace that it often went on tangents (footnotes) and as a reader reading the book, it added to the chaotic feeling. At points, Leonard’s internal struggles packed such a punch that I felt I needed to put down this book and reflect on what I had just read. (This explains why it took me nine days to read a 288 page book, and I’m not trying to come up with an excuse for my reading speed). That’s when you know you’ve got a powerful book in your hands.

Forgive Me, Leonard Peacock is my very first Matthew Quick book, and it definitely won’t be my last.

P.S.: Everyone deserves their own Herr Silverman in life.

Not a Book Related Post: Uniqso and Their Amazing Customer Service

Okay, before you judge me again but my circle lenses addiction started up again. I've been visiting Uniqso like daily just to "window shop". Sooooo pathetic! What's worst is that they have a huge collection of circle lenses which makes my "trying to quit" process reaaalllyy hard! 
And oh yeah! They have a HUGE sale going on right now!!! Since they are celebrating their 2nd anniversary, EVERYTHING is buy 2 get 1 free right now! Plus you get a chance to win this:

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